My Prairie Garden

This is the second year of my one acre prairie restoration project I have been working on in my yard. Last year’s step one was to cut down weeds and then break the soil to plant a Minnesota blend of prairie grass and wild flowers. This year will involve hand weeding and removing any noxious weeds (like ragweed and Canadian thistle) and allowing the grasses and wild flowers to gain a hold on the land.

So far I have noticed 4-5 different varieties of grasses along with some annual flowers that have sprouted. I am expecting some perennials and bi-annuals to begin showing up this fall for next year’s flowering.

I am expecting the garden to start maturing in 3-5 years.

Already I have noticed more birds and butterflies in the area along with a number of rabbits and critters to take advantage of the tall cover.

This fall I will add some small berry and honey suckle bushes to attract even more wildlife.

Below are a few pictures from my new prairie garden.

Prairie 2

7/2/2019 Wild Yarrow

7/2/2019 Black Eyed Susan (Rudbeckia Hirta)

7/2/2019 Black Eyed Susan

Prairie 6

7/2/2019 Native Grasses

Prairie 5

7/2/2019 Foxtail

Prairie 4

7/2/2019 Switchgrass

Prairie 3

7/2/2019 Foxtail

In The Orchard

Two years ago I planted a number of apple trees. During this last winter, a strong wind snapped off the top off one of the trees. This spring I noticed new growth coming from that broken sapling, just above the hybrid’s graft.

Grace Tanka

5/7/5 7/7

Damaged apple tree
Buds above the grower’s graft
Begins life again

Life gives some a second chance
When the sapling’s roots are strong

-CJ Holm

Farm Lament

old-minnesota-farmstead-don-anderson

This old farmstead damp after a spring shower. Hand colored. by Don Anderson

What Condition We’re In

Some call it a North Dakota condition
Where some rivers run north and poor crops are tradition.
Its’ farmers are Commies and its’ banking’s State-owned
Please pass the hot dish, your future’s postponed!

Once filled with small farms, quarter section in size
Now tilled with tractors and global positioning is prized.
Gone are the Holsteins, a milk house and barn cats for cream
So are the children who loved playing, farming and had big dreams.

Small towns are dried up, the schools gone away
Consolidation brings busing, two hours each day.
Gone are the churches, cafes and the small stores
Wheat fields, barley, and the dog’s locked indoors.

Time keeps on moving, no room for the past
Weather is changing, drought is forecast.
Empty the farmhouse, move into town
Go shopping at Walmart, and let’s just simmer down!

                                      -CJ Holm